[robotics-worldwide] [meetings] Waste Management 2017 (Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.A.) - New Topic and Session on Robotics

Rimando, Rodrigo Rodrigo.Rimando at em.doe.gov
Fri Aug 19 18:00:36 PDT 2016


The purpose of my e-mail message is to inform you of an opportunity to showcase your robotics research, technologies, expertise, capabilities, and products at a conference that has not featured robotics until now.  The Waste Management (WM) Conference 2017 will be held March 5 through 9, 2017 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.A.



NEW!  ROBOTICS!



At WM2017, for the first time, robotics is featured.  A new topic (9.12) and a new panel (R9.3) have been added.  These are summarized below.



9.12 Topic - Nuclearized Robotics and Developments in Remote Systems:  This topic accepts abstracts on all aspects of the use of robotics, remote systems and tools used in the nuclear industry, including needs, problem statements, research and development.  Abstracts are encouraged that discuss technology maturation, utilization, testing and verification, best practices, lessons learned, knowledge management and trends in robotics and remote systems, applications, facilities, use in emergency preparedness or response and recovery actions and the ability to withstand exposure to radioactive contamination or ionizing radiation.



R9.3 Panel - Nuclearized Robotics - International Perspectives on Use and Need:  This Panel will discuss many aspects of the use of robotics in the nuclear industry, including needs, problem statements, research and development.  Panelists representing different sectors of the nuclear industry will touch upon such items as technology maturation, utilization, testing and verification, best practices, lessons learned, knowledge management and trends in robotics and remote systems, applications, facilities, use in emergency preparedness or response and recovery actions and the ability to withstand exposure to radioactive contamination or ionizing radiation.



Consider submitting an abstract of a paper/article, oral presentation, and/or poster.  Abstracts are due no later than August 26, 2016, and can be submitted at https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.xcdsystem.com_wmsym_&d=DQIFAg&c=clK7kQUTWtAVEOVIgvi0NU5BOUHhpN0H8p7CSfnc_gI&r=0w3solp5fswiyWF2RL6rSs8MCeFamFEPafDTOhgTfYI&m=H4ceC27TwkXYXpqloYRYt2s6Jzohn_MqK0uQadEbje8&s=315gh9qUu1mPEl_VBMfcCZ7WG_6_9b5onPUt4GoO2qw&e= .



ABOUT THE CONFERENCE



The annual WM Conference, presented by WM Symposia (WMS), attracts thousands of professionals and students from around the world, and is widely regarded as the premier international conference for the management of radioactive material and related topics.  Since 1974, this conference has been a forum for discussing cost-effective and environmentally responsible solutions to the safe management and disposition of radioactive waste and radioactive materials.



WMS is a non-profit organization dedicated to education and opportunity in waste management.  It was founded to provide a forum for discussing and seeking cost-effective and environmentally responsible solutions to the safe management and disposition of radioactive waste and radioactive materials.



Topics of interest include research, development and operational experience over the broad spectrum of nuclear waste activities.  There will be panel and paper sessions focusing on special topics such as a featured country (Japan) and featured nuclear facilities (the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site in Richland, Washington and the DOE site in West Valley, New York).  There will also be special sessions on used/spent nuclear fuel, nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning, procurement and contracting, safety, clean-up of legacy sites worldwide, and International Atomic Energy Agency topics.  The complete detailed WM2017 topic listing is available at www.wmsym.org<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.wmsym.org&d=DQIFAg&c=clK7kQUTWtAVEOVIgvi0NU5BOUHhpN0H8p7CSfnc_gI&r=0w3solp5fswiyWF2RL6rSs8MCeFamFEPafDTOhgTfYI&m=H4ceC27TwkXYXpqloYRYt2s6Jzohn_MqK0uQadEbje8&s=kzqN9sHVXzIKzjeF3vaKmuKChKM4hD3qRCHU263SDcc&e= >.



Last year, WM2016 marked the 42nd year for the waste management conference during which nearly 30 countries were represented and over 2,000 engineers, scientists, managers and students attended.  The comprehensive technical program delivered over 500 papers and 134 technical sessions and panels.  It was complemented by an extensive exhibition that featured the United Kingdom.



ABOUT U.S. NUCLEAR CLEANUP



The DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) is charged with addressing the nation's Cold War environmental legacy resulting from five decades of nuclear weapons production and government-sponsored nuclear energy research.  This legacy includes some of the world's most dangerous radioactive sites with large amounts of radioactive wastes, spent nuclear fuel, excess plutonium and uranium, thousands of contaminated facilities, and contaminated soil and groundwater.  Created in 1989, DOE-EM has the responsibility for completing this challenging cleanup.



As the largest environmental cleanup program in the world, DOE-EM is responsible for cleaning up 107 sites across the U.S.  DOE-EM has made substantial progress in nearly every area of nuclear waste cleanup and has completed cleanup at 91 of these sites.  However, much more work is needed.  The remaining nuclear cleanup will take another 50 to 60 years at a cost that well exceeds $250 billion.



DOE-EM continually strives to improve safety and work quality while reducing the government's liability for cleanup of the environmental legacy left by the Cold War.  DOE-EM will apply the science of safety, and infuse and integrate technological advancements into the routines of work planning and execution. DOE-EM considers advanced robotics as a key enabling technology.  As such, DOE-EM seeks robotics for: (1) the handling of high-hazard, high-consequence materials and waste, (2) assisting in tasks that are dirty, dull, dangerous, and/or difficult to perform; (3) easing the performance of worker/operator tasks that are physically demanding on or stressful to human body or are otherwise ergonomically challenging; (4) performing tasks that are beyond human abilities; (5) improving the ability to respond to and recover from unplanned events or operational emergencies; and (6) improving the safety, quality, efficiency, and productivity of facility operations.



I welcome you to join me in Phoenix and share your robotics expertise and experience, even if you have no nuclear experience.  There are many technologies that are relevant and have utility to nuclear cleanup and waste management.  Help me make that connection.  Consider submitting an abstract; but hurry, abstracts are due in a few days on August 26.



Regards,



Rodrigo (Rod) V. Rimando, Jr., Director

Technology Development Office

Office of Environmental Management

U.S. Department of Energy

1000 Independence Ave., SW

Washington, DC 20585 USA


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